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Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
06-23-2015, 09:37 AM
Post: #11
RE: Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
Yes I think the breather tube and not the pcv is to blame for the map sensor and the throttle body getting dirty. If only there's an easier way to clean the TB.

[img][Image: 6ig1af.jpg][/img]
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06-23-2015, 10:24 AM
Post: #12
RE: Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
OT: may nakapag linis na ba ng throttle body?
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06-24-2015, 01:53 PM
Post: #13
RE: Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
air flows through that hose both ways depending on the load applied to the engine. during low load fresh air coming from the air duct flows towards the head. during high load its the other way around (from head to the air duct through the throttle body then finally to the combustion chamber) thats simply how positive crankcase ventilation works.

to clean the throttle body just remove the duct, have a rag and spray some brake cleaner to the rag and wipe the inside of the throttle have someone turn the ignition switch to on step on the accelerator to be able to clean it thoroughly (be careful not to get your fingers caught) dont spray cleaner directly to the throttle body.
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07-06-2015, 07:30 PM (This post was last modified: 07-18-2015 10:18 AM by Rolf.)
Post: #14
RE: Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
(06-23-2015 09:37 AM)NaimaRaiko Wrote:  Yes I think the breather tube and not the pcv is to blame for the map sensor and the throttle body getting dirty. If only there's an easier way to clean the TB.

I'm searching for something like this to insert at the breather line:
[Image: 20130326_114345.jpg]

And for the PCV line
[Image: $(KGrHqJHJFUFJ,qIEgipBSbEiutvF!~~60_12.JPG]

'Yong Greddy and Cusco types malaki kasi..
[Image: 428882655_207.jpg]
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07-18-2015, 10:23 AM
Post: #15
RE: Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
UPDATE: 7/18/2015
Looking for space where to mount ..
[Image: MjiAcmJ.jpg]

An excellent article from mishimoto

A catch can? Why do I need one?

The car didn’t come with one from the factory so why do I need one? This is a common question from newbies to the performance automotive world. On your factory PCV/CCV system, fuel and oil vapors pass through lines that make their way into your intake. The engine will then burn off these vapors in the combustion chamber. Although this process eliminates the need for a catch can and is generally considered normal practice in the automotive world, it does have a few downsides.

- Oil burning in the combustion chamber will lower octane levels and promote detonation.
- Contaminants will build up in the throttle body and intake manifold.


Why wouldn’t a manufacturer use a catch can, considering the negative impacts above? Well, I would assume the primary reasoning is simplicity and user friendliness. A factory-installed catch can would require emptying on a regular basis. Let’s face it, we humans are lazy. It is tough enough for vehicle owners to remember or even want to change their oil during the correct service intervals. Asking them to empty a catch can would be laughable. Emissions also plays a role in routing CCV vapors back into the intake. The most environmentally friendly way of eliminating these vapors and byproducts is to burn them in the combustion chamber. This keeps the system fully contained. This principle has been a standard for quite some time in both diesel and petrol applications and will likely remain so.

The catch can plays an important role in engine longevity, engine cleanliness, and efficiency of both the combustion mixture and the intercooler system (assuming your vehicle is turbocharged). The catch can mounts inline to the hose that returns to the intake system and works to separate the contaminants prior to their entry into the intake. Air enters into the catch can, where the vapors will be filtered and condensed to promote separation. In theory (and in a proper functioning setup) only clean air will return to the intake, thus protecting your engine from these harmful elements.

Now, why do these gases exist? In simple terms, during engine operation air will flow past the piston rings and into the crankcase area; this is referred to as blow-by. This is unavoidable, as a perfect ring seal is impossible to achieve. Because this air is passing into the crankcase, it will need to be vented to prevent issues. A pressurized crankcase with no relief will result in leaking engine seals, a loss of power (due to its affect on piston movement), oil flow past the rings (resulting in a nice white smoke cloud), and several other major concerns. It is imperative that this air is released in an effective manner. Additionally, modern systems utilize a vacuum source in the CCV system to keep a pull of airflow on the ventilation line.

You may be asking yourself, why don’t I just vent these vapors into the atmosphere? Why return them to my engine at all? Because you are an environmentally conscious individual, that’s why. Returning these oil vapors/liquids to the air is harmful to the environment and terrible for the roadways.

Now, don’t assume that these setups are necessary only for turbocharged applications. All engines produce blow-by, some more than others.

Source:
http://engineering.mishimoto.com/?cat=124
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07-20-2015, 09:01 AM
Post: #16
RE: Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
Sir rolf mukhang ok jan sa spot na yan, easy access kung magdrain ka ng contaminated oil from catch can.

[img][Image: 6ig1af.jpg][/img]
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07-20-2015, 11:23 AM
Post: #17
RE: Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
Hardware mounts now ready .. will install after my 15K PMS.

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“It’s hard to win an argument with a smart person, but it’s damn near impossible to win an argument with a stupid person.” – Bill Murray
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07-20-2015, 01:17 PM
Post: #18
RE: Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
^Picture sir pag installed na 1

[img][Image: 6ig1af.jpg][/img]
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08-29-2015, 03:05 PM (This post was last modified: 08-29-2015 03:19 PM by Rolf.)
Post: #19
RE: Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
GreddY Oil Catch Can installed
[Image: TmgchJG.jpg]

After 483 KMS since installation, I replaced the output hose on my Greddy with a better one. This is what I found >>
[Image: p28MY7z.jpg]
Trace of oil ...

With this observation, I am now more than convinced on what the EXPERTS say >>

"Blowby gases do occur, whether you have NA engine or Turbo"

You would want only clean fuel and clean air in your combustion chamber to burn. Why would you mix oil with them?

Thanks @NaimaRaiko for bringing out this PCV thing to the forum!

A peek of my Greddy after replacement of the outlet hose.
[Image: 6sBvQBI.jpg]

My next study >> the interaction of the gases from the breather line with the the MAP sensor and how to prevent or at least minimize the soot formation on the sensor.
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08-30-2015, 12:53 AM
Post: #20
RE: Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV)
Dati ginawa namin is yung plastic na fuel filter ang ghetto style oil catch can
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